From TwinCities.Com:

The Science Museum of Minnesota’s new exhibit “Space: An Out-of-Gravity Experience” includes a full scale mock-up of a International Space Station (ISS) research lab, video footage of astronauts living and working in space and the opportunity to learn to operate a robotic arm. The museum’s Omnitheater is hosting a film looking at NASA’s Space Shuttle program, the launch of the ISS and the future of space flight.

Advertisements

LPZ

From Chicago Architecture Blog:

The Lincoln Park Zoo has received approval to build a new education center. The facility will feature mixed-use space with open work areas, a high-tech learning lab, a recording studio and sound booth, and a reception area. The space can be arranged and adapted for different projects and needs.

From Educational World:

States including Arkansas, Nebraska and Kansas have adopted the National Core Arts Standards released in October, including new guidelines for animation, computer design, film, and gaming. The updated standards are not connected to the Common Core, but they promote college and career readiness goals.

Education Week

From Education Week:

Each year, Education Week spotlights work from school district leaders around the country in its “Leaders to Learn From” report. For 2015, they profiled 16 leaders who are tackling issues and challenges such as parent engagement, educational technology, student voice, career pathways, and extended learning time.

From The Journal:

The Computer Science Teachers Association recently conducted a survey of secondary school leaders across the country. Of those that responded, there was not a standardized set of learning standards in schools where computer science courses are part of the curriculum. The results also indicated a lack of shared curricular content and of common definitions of computer science education.

AAAS

From The Conversation:

What factors shape American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) members’ political awareness and communication behaviors? This study is based on data from a 2009 Pew Research Center survey. The authors looked at how often AAAS members talked to reporters, engaged with non-scientists, or wrote for a blog and how important they believed media coverage was for career advancement.

From The Conversation

From The Atlantic

From New Jersey.com

From NPR