Archives for posts with tag: Education Policy

No Child Left Behind

From The New York Times:

This article tracks the history of No Child Left Behind as well as the current debates about rewriting the law. It also looks at how schools have aimed to show success through measures other than test scores and the role of academic standards like the Common Core.

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From Educational World:

States including Arkansas, Nebraska and Kansas have adopted the National Core Arts Standards released in October, including new guidelines for animation, computer design, film, and gaming. The updated standards are not connected to the Common Core, but they promote college and career readiness goals.

Education Week

From Education Week:

Each year, Education Week spotlights work from school district leaders around the country in its “Leaders to Learn From” report. For 2015, they profiled 16 leaders who are tackling issues and challenges such as parent engagement, educational technology, student voice, career pathways, and extended learning time.

TFA

From The New York Times:

For the second year in a row, applicants for the Teach for America program have dropped, breaking a 15-year growth trend. This article identifies various reasons for the decline in applications, from more job choices for high-achieving college graduates to broader questions about the model of the program and its effectiveness.

Holly Yetick head shot. Swikar Patel/Education Week

Holly Yetick head shot. Swikar Patel/Education Week

From Education Week:

In a recent address, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan discussed the Obama administration’s education plans for the next two years. Duncan talked about budget plans and also stressed that the administration would not back away from annual testing for students and performance evaluations of teachers based in part on those test results. However, the administration will ask Congress to call on states to set limits on how much time can be spent on state and local testing.

Teacher Education Programs

From Education Week:

Although there has been much discussion about improving teacher preparation through a variety of methods, there has been less focus on the role that states play in auditing existing teacher education preparation providers. Education Week reviewed decisions states had made about closing teacher preparation programs in 2009-10 and 2013-14 and compared these decisions to states’ teacher preparation standards. The report argues that the insularity of states’ review processes allows for little public scrutiny that might impel states to close programs that fail to meet standards.

From Venture Beat:

Angry Birds mobile game maker Rovio has unveiled details of its Fun Learning education initiative, aimed at remaking education for kids aged three to six. Rovio is working to create a new kind of school uniform that will encourage fun learning as well as developing a curriculum of gaming, digital learning, and physical world learning. The program will train teachers and provide new kinds of digital games, such as gesture-controlled games for solving puzzles. The program is being developed in Finland and Beijing and is intended to promote “flow” or an optimal state of excitement, like when we are playing games.

Saveya Howlett, 7, left, and her uncle, Nick Scott,. attend an after-school common core math class at Old Orchard Elementary School in Toledo, Ohio on Nov. 11, 2014. Math coach Mr. Gary Harvey leads the class that teaches parents how to use common core "thinking math" to help their kids with homework that's likely different than the traditional math they learned in school. --Brian Widdis for Education Week   Brian Widdis for Education Week

Saveya Howlett, 7, left, and her uncle, Nick Scott,. attend an after-school common core math class at Old Orchard Elementary School in Toledo, Ohio on Nov. 11, 2014. Math coach Mr. Gary Harvey leads the class that teaches parents how to use common core “thinking math” to help their kids with homework that’s likely different than the traditional math they learned in school. –Brian Widdis for Education Week
Brian Widdis for Education Week

From Education Week:

This article summarizes outreach efforts that schools are making to communicate with parents and guardians about how common core standards will change math instruction. Schools around the country are holding math nights, sending letters home, and posting videos on their websites to teach parents about the Common Core State Standards for mathematics. The article also takes a historical view to examine how parents have reacted in the past to nontraditional math strategies and the connection between parental involvement and test scores.

From New York Times:

The Obama administration is directing states to show how they will ensure that all students have equal access to high-quality teachers, with a strong focus on schools with a high proportion of the poor and racial minorities. In a letter to state superintendents released on November 10, Deborah S. Delisle, assistant secretary at the Department of Education, said states must develop plans by next June that make sure that public schools comply with existing federal law requiring that “poor and minority children are not taught at higher rates than other children by inexperienced, unqualified or out-of-field teachers.” States last submitted plans to address such inequities in 2006, but information indicates that large disparities persist.

Inquiry-Based Learning

From Mind Shift:

In a series of interviews, ten students at Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Philadelphia describe their positive and challenging experience with inquiry-based learning. SLA is a partnership between The School District of Philadelphia and The Franklin Institute and has become well-known for its project-based, inquiry focused teaching style, which asks students to demonstrate their learning in a variety of ways. Students like the approach, but acknowledge that sometimes it puts them at a disadvantage when it comes to testing.