Archives for posts with tag: New York Times

No Child Left Behind

From The New York Times:

This article tracks the history of No Child Left Behind as well as the current debates about rewriting the law. It also looks at how schools have aimed to show success through measures other than test scores and the role of academic standards like the Common Core.

TFA

From The New York Times:

For the second year in a row, applicants for the Teach for America program have dropped, breaking a 15-year growth trend. This article identifies various reasons for the decline in applications, from more job choices for high-achieving college graduates to broader questions about the model of the program and its effectiveness.

AMNH

From The New York Times:

The American Museum of Natural History is planning a $325 million, six-story addition designed to foster the institution’s expanding role as a center for scientific research and education. The new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education and Innovation, which could open as early as 2019, will feature exhibitions showcasing scientific topics as well as labs and theaters for scientific presentations.

Robot Exhibit

From The New York Times:

Robot Swarm, an exhibit featuring dozens of glowing, motorized, interactive robots, will open at the National Museum of Mathematics in Manhattan (MoMath) on December 15. Designed to demonstrate the mathematics of emergent behavior, the exhibit will allow four visitors at a time to control robots by moving their own bodies and using a control panel. MoMath hopes that Robot Swarm will appeal to all age groups from toddlers to older students who can grasp the mathematical concepts involved.

From New York Times:

The Obama administration is directing states to show how they will ensure that all students have equal access to high-quality teachers, with a strong focus on schools with a high proportion of the poor and racial minorities. In a letter to state superintendents released on November 10, Deborah S. Delisle, assistant secretary at the Department of Education, said states must develop plans by next June that make sure that public schools comply with existing federal law requiring that “poor and minority children are not taught at higher rates than other children by inexperienced, unqualified or out-of-field teachers.” States last submitted plans to address such inequities in 2006, but information indicates that large disparities persist.

Apprentice

From New York Times:

Over the course of the last school year, The New York Times followed the paths of three residents of the Aspire Public Schools, a charter system with schools in California and Memphis that has a lengthy and intense mentorship process. Focusing on apprenticeships and time spent in the classroom rather than more theory-based teacher training, the Aspire model is one of a number of such programs emerging across the country. The United States Department of Education is focusing more on the quality of teacher preparation programs and has designated $35 million in grants this year to help colleges and school districts develop new teacher training, prioritizing residencies like Aspire’s.

From The New York Times:

As part of an effort to encourage more low-income students to apply, the University of Chicago is implementing a series of measures that will both streamline the admissions process and make studying at the University more affordable. The measures include eliminating the expectation that low- and middle-income students take jobs during the academic year, guaranteeing them paid summer internships after their first year in college, providing career counseling beginning their first year, and eliminating loans from financial aid packages.

Comic Books

From The Atlantic:

This article outlines recent efforts to incorporate comic books into the classroom. For example, the non-profit Reading with Pictures recently released Reading With Pictures: Comics That Make Kids Smarter, an anthology featuring 180 pages of original content. Each story is aligned with Common Core Standards and the anthology includes a 150-page teacher’s guide with a lesson plan for each comic. Other artists have released comic books featuring characters with math-based superpowers and illustrations and storytelling to show kids how to engineer their own inventions.

From The New York Times:

A small but growing number of companies like Wonder Workshop and KinderLab Robotics are seeking to teach computer programming to children through robotics. One of the founders of KinderLab Robotics, Marina Umaschi Bers, conducted research at Tufts University showing that children as young as 5 could learn to code if given tools appropriate for their age. The KinderLab robot is modular and relies on wooden blocks that its young programmers arrange in sequence. These patterns that the programmers have arranged are transformed into actions, like dancing, moving, and flashing a light. Other robots, like the Wonder Workshop products, are programmed using tablets and smartphone applications.

research spotlight article

From The New York Times:

A new study, published in the journal CBE Life Science Education, looked at six semesters of an introductory biology class at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Three terms took a lecture-based approach and three demanded more participation by students. The more active approach gave students more in-class activities and online exercises that forced students to think about the material rather than just memorize it. This active learning strategy raised average test scores more than 3 percentage points. This score increase was doubled, to more than 6 percentage points, for black students and first-generation college students. Other studies have shown similar improvements from demanding more student interaction, but did not break that down by demographic groups. Full text of the study can be found here.