Archives for posts with tag: The Atlantic

From The Atlantic

Science Communication

From The Atlantic:

Several classes have sprung up at colleges across the country designed to help early-career scientists hone their writing skills. Although educators don’t have a consensus about how or what scientists should be learning in order to become better communicators, the teachers of these classes focus on aspects of writing that they teach to all their students, no matter the discipline, like using analogies to communicate complex ideas.

From The Atlantic

From The Atlantic:

This article discusses Discovering the Art of Mathematics: Mathematical Inquiry in the Liberal Arts (DAoM). The DAoM approach is rooted in inquiry-based learning and focuses on student-led investigations into problems, experiments, and prompts. Steven Strogatz, Professor of Applied Mathematics at Cornell University, has been working to implement this approach in an introductory math class. In his class, he integrates memorization and knowledge of basic facts with a deeper understanding of what those facts mean, why they’re important, and where they come up in the real world.

From The Atlantic

From The Atlantic

PMP

From The Atlantic:

Practice Makes Perfect, currently in its fourth year, is designed to reduce the loss of academic skills and knowledge that occurs during the summer months. The founder of the program, Karim Abouelnaga, has created a model where students teach each other, building upon his observations that younger children are more receptive to teachers from their own neighborhoods or backgrounds. Practice Makes Perfect is currently in the process of changing from fully philanthropic to a more sustainable fee-for-service approach, which Abouelnaga hopes will allow the program to expand and reach areas where its services are most needed.

From The Atlantic

Women In Stem Degrees

From The Atlantic:

Highlighting the work of Emily Graslie, the Field Museum’s Chief Curiosity Correspondent, and Mary Flanagan, the founder of Tiltfactor, this article argues that women may choose to navigate their careers differently than men do and may be following non-traditional paths to apply their skills to STEM fields. The article hopes that female perspectives and approaches could expand the definition and scope of what it means to be STEM professionals. For example, Flanagan’s company, Tiltfactor, is a conceptual game research lab that designs innovative board games and software that educate through play, explore issues of equity and social change, and challenge gender stereotypes. Flanagan recently wrote that while boys and girls play video games in equal numbers, women represent only 13 percent in the video game industry, and points to women as a source of “fresh voices and new ideas” in the industry.

From The Atlantic:

This editorial compares the political climate and public opinion towards science when the original Cosmos ran on television in the 80s to today’s opinions. The original Cosmos kicked off a decade-long “popular science boom,” according to Bruce Lewenstein, a professor of science communications at Cornell University. When Lewenstein asked scientists between the ages of 30 and 60 to name something that made them want to be scientists, a large number cite Cosmos. However, beyond raw numbers of viewers and anecdotal reports of personal inspiration, there is a lack of data on how Cosmos actually affected public support for science, making it difficult to consider any impact of the newer Cosmos in comparison to the original. The author of the editorial argues that we should consider the new Cosmos on its own terms, rather than pinning extremely high hopes about increased understanding of science or greater agreement about climate change and clean energy on a television show.